See the Big Dipper in the Summer Night Sky

If you step outside and look skyward as soon as darkness falls on these summer evenings, chances are you’ll be able to pick out one of the most prominent and recognizable celestial patterns: the Big Dipper.

If you live in the Northern Hemisphere you only need to look high toward the northwest sky to find the seven bright stars that make up the famous Big Dipper. For most stargazers, the Big Dipper is probably the most important group of stars in the sky.

For anyone at the latitude of New York (41 degrees north) or all points northward, the Big Dipper never sinks below the horizon. It is one of the most recognizable star patterns in the sky and therefore one of the easiest for the novice to find.

In other parts of the world, these seven stars are known not as a Dipper, but as some sort of a wagon.

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Image: This sky map shows how the Big Dipper appears in the summer sky at 10 pm to observers mid-northern latitudes in June 2012. Credit: Starry Night Software

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  1. electrif1re reblogged this from discoverynews and added:
    used to be obsessed with finding the little & big dipper
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